Designing for Wearables: Sketchnotes from Google I/O

This session, held during the first day of Google I/O, focused purely on design principles and process for Android Wear and Google Glass.  A panel of 4 designers rotated through an in-depth presentation sharing their insights on topics ranging from voice input, contextual design and glanceable displays. This presentation also stood out as one with a strong resonant theme: The world is the experience.

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Material Design Principles: Sketchnotes from Google I/O

Before the I/O announcement of Android L and “Material Design”, this session was originally called “Cross Platform Design”. The speakers discussed some of the overall principles and applications of the company’s new design system across devices.

I enjoyed the discussion of metaphors as it sounded similar to the original push for skeumorphism in early mobile app design. We’ve focused far too much on judging skeumorphism as 100% bad, when instead we should focus on what it was trying to achieve (metaphors are effective at communication) and work on improving that foundational concept (as Material Design is attempting to do). Learn more about Material Design here.

My sketchnotes follow.

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Google I/O Keynote: Sketchnotes

This year’s Google I/O keynote was jam-packed with announcements ranging from Android Wear to Google Drive for Business. One of the big themes was the need to create seamless, cross-platform experiences.  The following are my sketches from the Google I/O opening keynote with a focus on the cross-platform announcements like Wear, Auto and TV.

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Sketchnotes from Girl Geek Dinner #61

Girl Geek Dinner #61 was hosted at Microsoft’s new technology center in Mountain View. In addition to mingling with fellow female designers, developers, businesspeople and more, the evening included two talks and a panel with some talented Microsoft employees. Below are my sketchnotes from the two main talks.

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The 6 R’s of helpful wearable design

After checking out the design principles of Android Wear, I found myself thinking particularly about the third principle, “Helpful”. Certainly in UX design a product needs to be helpful before anything else. But what does it mean to build helpful experiences for wearables, specifically?

<>To me, it seems that helpful wearable devices or wearable apps would do the following (the “6 R’s”):

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Patterns for new user experiences

I’ve been keeping an ongoing collection of first time user experiences (FTUEs) at http://firsttimeux.tumblr.com/. In this post, I’ve distilled the most common approaches I’ve observed being used today into a list of 8 design patterns and anti-patterns. Each pattern has a description, pros/cons list, design considerations, and an example. You may recognize a few of these because many are modern takes on well-established UX patterns.  My hope is for this to serve as a helpful reference as you develop your own first time user experiences.

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Special Edition Greyjoy Free Game of Thrones Valentine!

It was pointed out to me that I’d forgotten House Greyjoy in my Free Game of Thrones-inspired Valentines patterns. Instead of making another that matched the set, I created instead a DIY printable Valentine which you can give to your loved one (or enemy) for some interactive fun!

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Sketchnotes from “Body Languages of Interaction Design”

Irene Au presented the second-day opening keynote at Interaction 14. Her talk was focused on how body language, mindfulness and forms of meditation can improve our lives as well as our ability to design empathetically. My sketchnotes follow below.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Designing for privacy in mobile and web apps”

In her Interaction 14 presentation, Amber Case gave a compelling overview of privacy best practices when creating experiences in which user data is requested and stored. Even more interesting was her discussing the idea of homesteading vs. sharecropping, an idea that true privacy control improvement could come from users creating and owning more of the domains on which their data is hosted. Below are my sketchnotes from her talk.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Evangelizing and Designing Voice User Interface”

I work on a variety of interface types and was excited to attend a presentation about designing VUI (Voice User Interfaces) at Interaction 14. “Evangelizing and Designing Voice User Interface: Adopting VUI in a GUI world” was presented by Stephen Gay of Intuit and Susan Hura of SpeechUsability, and gave a good overview of VUI design principles, considerations and opportunities. The following are my sketchnotes from this talk.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Comics: A Medium in Transition”

Scott McCloud is a speaker who often doesn’t need introduction. In this Day 1 closing keynote at Interaction 14, he discussed the changing medium of comics by covering the reasons why pictures are better than words, the right kinds of simplification, and motion’s effect on comics. The following are my sketchnotes from his talk, which taper off a tad towards the end so that I could catch some of his humorous slides.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Pitching Ideas: How to sell your ideas to other people?”

I enjoyed this presentation at Interaction 14 by Jeroen van Geel. His presentation deconstructed a “pitch” into 3 main activities: Honing in on exactly what the idea is; knowing who you are pitching to; and the act of convincing those people to support your idea. learning about your audience, and convincing them that your idea is worth supporting. Below are my sketchnotes from this session.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Food = interaction”

Bernard Lahousse is a biochemist who has been studying the science and experience of food. He gave a very compelling and interactive presentation at Interaction 14 that illuminated how tweaking input of the 5 senses could change the experience of the same food product, and also talked about constructing interest food pairings. My sketchnotes from his talk follow.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Languaging reality, dialogue and interaction”

For the opening keynote of Interaction 14, established professor Klaus Krippendorff gave a detailed presentation about how language—and the audience of language—shape the realities in which we live. Below are the sketchnotes that I was able to capture, but I encourage you to read some of his writings to get a deeper dive into these theories.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “C-Speak For Designers”

A first of its kind, Angel Anderson hosted a 3 hour Interaction 14 workshop on the topic of presenting compelling cases for design work and decisions to c-level executives. Especially fun was the critique I received in the hands-on portion, where I pitched an idea to some well-armed peers representing CMO, CFO, CTO and COO roles. My sketchnotes from the informational portion of the workshop follow.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Free Valentines heart patterns inspired by Game of Thrones

NEW! I created a special edition print-at-home Greyjoy pattern card. See it here.

Winter crafting wouldn’t be complete without some artistic activities for Valentine’s Day. Following in the theme from the Game of Thrones-inspired snowflake patterns, I’ve created heart-shaped paper cutouts using interpretations of the Lannister lion, Baratheon stag, Targaryen dragon, and Stark direwolf sigils. And, like the snowflakes, I’m sharing these patterns for free! Read on for instructions and downloadable patterns.

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Free snowflake patterns inspired by Game of Thrones

NEW! Check out Game of Thrones-inspired Valentine’s Day heart patterns here!

It’s almost the holidays, and I’ve been itching to make some kind of Game of Thrones-themed Christmas craft. I came up with GoT-inspired snowflake patterns. I’m sharing them as free, printable JPGs so everyone can enjoy them!

Read on for the patterns and instructions.

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Sketchnotes from “Lean Engineering”

As a follow-on to his Lean Day West workshop from the previous day, PayPal Senior Director Bill Scott talked more about the principles of instituting a lean engineering process at a large company. You’ll find that some of my sketchnotes overlap those I took from the workshop and so they’re simpler by comparison.

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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Sketchnotes from “Building with Lean”

The concept of pairing is not a new one in the design circle. But designer Jono Mallanyk and developer Ben Burton really put pairing to the test as they collaborated on product development with a lean approach. At Lean Day West they hypothesized that the best team is a “two burger team”, that is, one that can be fed with just two burgers. A team that can be fed with two pizzas is probably too big!

If you would like to use my sketchnotes in a presentation, please credit me and my blog and drop me a line to let me know which one(s) you plan to reference. Thanks!

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